Results tagged ‘ Drew Sutton ’

5-6-4

The infield.

One of the few competitions in Spring Training was for the fifth infielder position.  Manager Cecil Cooper decided that he wanted a backup shortstop who could play other positions, so that he could give Miguel Tejada more rest.

That decision – instead of getting a second baseman who could handle other positions, thereby allowing the Astros to plug someone in when Kazuo Matsui inevitably went down to injury – led to a severe mishandling of David Newhan.  Newhan, a second baseman by trade, was never really given a chance to fail, despite being better than most of the other candidates.

Jason Smith had a torrid Spring and earned the spot.  He is now 0-for-2009, and is exhibiting his massively-limited range at second base.  Why?  Because, surprise of surprises, Kazuo Matsui went down with a bad back.  Jeff Keppinger, who is slated to fill in all over the infield, is also out with back woes.

Though Drew Sutton might not have been ready to come up anyway, he is certainly not an option now that he has been named as the PTBN in the Keppinger deal.  There are no other legitimate second-base options in the system.

That leaves Smith, struggling.  Exactly as everyone predicted.

Oh, and Tejada?  No days off yet.

Gee, who would have predicted any of that?  Oh, right.  Everyone.  Well, everyone but Cecil Cooper.

And for all of this horrible mishandling of such a basic position battle, it was announced today that Cooper would be retained through the 2010 season.  Perfect.

What Happened Was…

Houston Astros (MLB) – We all know Wandy Rodriguez can pitch at Minute Maid Park.  He had his curveball working today, and allowed just two hits, striking out 10 (including five consecutive) in 7.0 innings and earning his first win of the season.  Carlos Lee was 3-for-3 with an RBI, 2 runs, and a walk.

Round Rock Express (AAA) – The Express tried their hardest to lose, giving up three runs in the bottom of the eighth, but luckily they’d just scored three in the top of the eighth, as well, and beat the Iowa Cubs (CHC) 7-5.  2 home runs from Reggie Abercrombie and another from Mark Saccomanno paced the offense.  Abercrombie went 2-for-3 with 4 RBI, and Saccomanno went 2-for-4 with 3 RBI.  Bud Norris made it 5.1 innings, giving up 2 runs on 3 hits and 4 walks to go with his 6 strikeouts.  Chad Paronto earned his second save, giving up just one hit and striking out two in as many innings.

Corpus Christi Hooks (AA) – The Hooks took a 5-3 lead into the ninth inning, and ended up losing to the Tulsa Drillers (COL) 6-5.  Douglas Arguello pitched well, going 5.2 innings with 7 strikeouts, allowing 3 runs on as many hits, along with 2 walks.  Paul Estrada made it just 0.2 innings before giving up 3 runs to lose the game.  SS Wladimir Sutil had a career night, going 2-for-2 with 2 walks, stole 3 bases, and scored 2 runs.

DisneyLand 044.jpgLancaster Jethawks (A+) – The Jethawks allowed 3 runs in the fifth inning, falling to the High Desert Mavericks (SEA), 4-2.  David “The Other David Duncan” Duncan continued to struggle on the mound, with 4.2 IP and 3 ER, raising his ERA on the season to 14.85.  Offseason acquisition Chia-Jen Lo threw 1.1 perfect innings in relief, striking out three.  The offense sputtered; Jason Castro went 1-for-4 and Koby Clemens went 0-for-1 off the bench.  Jack Shuck was the only Jethawk with multiple hits, going 2-for-4 and stealing a base.  Phillipe Aumont, who I got on Wednesday throwing a bullpen, threw a perfect 1.1 innings in relief.

Lexington Legends (A) – The Legends continued to own the West Virginia Power (PIT), 4-0.  Starter Robert Bono didn’t blow anyone away, but allowed just 5 hits and no walks through 6.0 innings to get the win.  He’s now thrown 11.0 shutout innings and stands at 2-0.  Jack Tilghman pitched the final three innings to earn the save, striking out 4 innings and allowing three hits and no walks.  1B Kody Hinze went 1-for-2 with a home run and a walk.  OF Jay Austin finally had a good night, as well, going 2-for-3 at the plate with a walk, a run, and an RBI.  He also stole his first base of the season, but also got caught on an attempt. 

Sutton is the PTBN

When the Astros traded a Player To Be Named (PTBN) to the Cincinnati Reds for infielder Jeff Keppinger, it was widely considered to be a pretty darned good move.  We’d filled a need at third base, as well as adding a bench player who could fill in at several positions on an as-needed basis.

And though we didn’t know who we’d be giving up to get him, the understanding was that it would be a minor leaguer; perhaps one with a little upside, but since the Astros were making the deal with a position of power – since Keppinger was out of options, the Reds would have to expose him to waivers before they sent him down.  At least by making this trade, they were going to get something for the loss of Keppinger.

Today, that “something” was announced, in the form of Drew Sutton.

With a farm system ranked #30 out of 30, the Astros don’t have a lot of top-end prospects to build the future of the club around.  Tommy Manzella, Sutton, Chris Johnson, Bud Norris, and Brian Bogusevic are pretty much the only prospects currently in the system with immediate major league-ready talent.

Losing Sutton makes a significant dent in that limited talent pool.  Though Keppinger has been very hot in his Astros career, his long-term value is not great.  Once Johnson is promoted to the Majors, Geoff Blum will be moved to the bench, leaving Jason Smith and Keppinger as the options for utility infielder.  Even assuming Kazuo Matsui has to miss extended time, as usual, making Keppinger the starting second baseman; beyond this season, it’s hard to see where he fits in.

Sutton, on the other hand, is the team’s second baseman of the future.  One of the major reasons the Astros organizations is in the shape it’s currently in is that we’ve given up too much value for too little a return.  Five players for Miguel Tejada, for instance.  Willy Taveras, Taylor Buchholz, and Jason Hirsh for Jason Jennings and Miguel Asencio. I’m sure I don’t need to go on.

I appreciate what Jeff Keppinger brings to the table this season, but to give up one of the very few top-end prospects we’ve got in the system is, once again, overpaying.

A-Rod Fallout

As you’ve no doubt heard by now, Alex Rodriguez may have to withdraw from the WBC due to a hip injury.

You never like to see such a high-profile player go down to injury, but my thoughts immediately turned in a different direction than most people’s.

If Alex Rodriguez misses the WBC, does this make Miguel Tejada the Dominican Republic’s starting third baseman?

Miguel Tejada 2.jpgTejada withdrew from the Classic after hearing a rumor that he was going to be used primarily as a first baseman.  Then, with manager Felipe Alou’s eventual assurance that he would play shortstop, third base, and DH, he changed his mind and joined the team.

With Rodriguez in the lineup at third, and Jose Reyes and Hanley Ramirez at shortstop, it wasn’t immediately clear how much playing time Tejada would get in the infield.  Now, that’s all changed.

Barring whomever would replace A-Rod on the roster, the only other third baseman currently with the team is Willy Aybar.  Given that option, it seems reasonable to assume that Tejada would become the starting third baseman.

And that, as far as I’m concerned, is a problem for the Houston Astros.

Carlos Lee.jpgI’m generally pro-WBC.  I don’t mind players taking the added injury risk to play for their countries.  LaTroy Hawkins, Roy Oswalt, and Carlos Lee are all involved in the classic, and bully for them.  These are three guys who performed for the Astros last year.  They did exactly the job they were asked to do, and they did it well.

But Tejada’s short tenure with the Astros has been tumultuous, at best.  First, he was caught lying about his age.  Then, he suffered a mid-season slump that hurt the team in a bad way.  Next, he was indicted for lying to federal investigators.  Then came the WBC.

Simply put, I feel pretty strongly that Miguel should be in camp.  He should be getting reps as a shortstop.  He should be preparing himself to earn the money he’s getting paid – an albatross contract, signed under false pretenses regarding his age.  That contract, and the five players we gave up to get Tejada from the Orioles, could be singled out as the single-largest reason the Astros were unable to make a move of any merit this offseason.

The news that he may get significant playing time at another position doesn’t sit well with me.

Tommy Manzella 2.jpgOf course, there is another option, given the Astros’ holes at third base.  If Tejada shows himself to be a competent third baseman, perhaps Coop may consider moving him there permanently, and allowing either Tommy Manzella or Drew Sutton to play shortstop, assuming Chris Johnson is sent to AAA at the end of Spring Training.

Knowing Cooper, that seems unlikely, but it is a possibility.  Tejada’s still a better-fielding shortstop than he gets credit for (he had a 4.01 RFg in 2008, six points above adjusted league average), but he is aging (three years more quickly than we’d realized.)


In other news, Roy Oswalt will be on The Late Show With David Letterman tomorrow (Thursday) night for the Top 10 list: “Reasons To Watch The World Baseball Classic.”

Jason Grey Loves The Astros

Apparently, I made the list of “Latest Leaders” at MLBlogosphere today.  Truth be told, I’m not entirely sure what that means, but in honor of my debut at #47, I’ll dedicate today’s post to one of the many great #47s that the Astros have had, Joaquin Andujar:

Joaquin Andujar.jpg

Over at ESPN, fantasy expert Jason Grey has unveiled his list of the top prospects in baseball, based on potential contributions to their Major League teams this season.

It begs the question: What in the world makes someone a fantasy expert?

Rather than answer that question, though, I’d like to talk about the article.  Inclusion in this list is something of a double-edged sword.  While it means that you have some young players that have at least one baseball (ish) writer excited, it must be remembered that this is a list of players expected to contribute this year.

Which means your Major League roster can’t be all that solid, now, can it?

Be that as it may, we Astros fans are ravenous to see our few prospects show up on lists that have numbers next to their names, so even if this was a list of the best fifty minor league baseball players at spelling “dichotomous,” we’d be pleased as punch to see four of our youngsters on the list.

Never mind that one of the guys, Lou Palmisano, may not actually be an Astro this year, since he was a Rule 5 selection.

The names aren’t necessarily new to Astros fans.  In fact, all four players are currently in Spring Training and doing just fine, thank you very much.

Drew Sutton2.jpgTopping the list at #46 is infielder Drew Sutton.  At the moment, Sutton may be best known to Astros fans as the guy with the really embarrassing error in the really embarrassing Spring Training loss to the Mets.  To be fair, he was playing first base – a position where he has spent all of two games since his professional career began in 2004.  In real life, he’s a second baseman who plays some third as well, and has experience at shortstop and, in theory, the aforementioned first base.

Which begs the question: Why in the world would Drew Sutton play first base in a Spring Training game?  The only answer I can come up with is that Cecil Cooper is strongly considering him for a utility infielder role, and wants to see how he does at each infield position.  With Lance Berkman at first base, there’s no hole to fill; Geoff Blum and Darin Erstad are 25-man roster guys who also play the position, and Mark Saccomanno is the minor leaguer most likely to fill in if needed.  So it seems to be purely a matter of seeing how Sutton responds, and getting him as many at-bats as possible this spring.

Bud Norris.jpgNext on Mr. Grey’s list, at #50, is our good friend, pitcher Bud Norris.  Norris is high on management’s list of prospects, and for good reason.  His single inning in Spring Training yielded no hits, no walks, no runs, and two strikeouts.  The article, however, mentions that Norris is largely a sleeper because “Here is the projected Astros rotation behind Roy Oswalt and Wandy Rodriguez as of this writing: Mike Hampton, Brian Moehler and Brandon Backe . And LaTroy Hawkins is Jose Valverde’s primary set-up man.”

He says this as a means of maligning the Astros’ pitching situation.  Normally, I would be all for maligning them, but Hampton is very good when he’s healthy, Moehler pitched very well in 2008, and Backe will probably not be the fifth starter.  And LaTroy Hawkins?  Well, as much as people like to downplay Hawkins as a set-up man, since 2000, he’s only had one season where his ERA+ was under 100.  Even in 2008, after his tumultuous run with the Yankees, he came to Houston and posted the following line:

21.0 IP, 2-0, 0.43 ERA (992 ERA+), 0.762 WHIP, 25 K, 5 BB

Admittedly, a tiny sample size, but it hardly makes one run screaming to the phone to look for Norris as an emergency set-up man.  Hawkins’ career numbers are skewed because he was terrible as a starter and terrible as a closer, but as a set-up man he’s actually been pretty darned good.  His line from 2000-2008 with the Twins, Cubs, Giants, Orioles, Rockies, Yankees, and Astros(which does include some stints as a closer):

612.7 IP, 33-33, 76 SV, 3.35, 1.267 WHIP, 449 K, 192 BB

Not really all that shabby, honestly.  Certainly nothing that means that Bud Norris is likely to replace him as the primary set-up guy.

Christopher Johnson.jpgNext on the list, at #61, is 3B Chris Johnson.  Had you asked me a month ago (and many people did,) I would have told you that Chris needed at least half a year in AAA before he was ready to see action at the major league level.  Then came Spring Training, and so far, he’s looked very comfortable:

6 G, .500/.500/1.000, 1 2B, 1 HR, 1 R, 5 RBI

Still very early, but his confidence at the plate – combined with his glove at third base – is likely to keep him in the conversation.

Of course, the article also cited Geoff Blum as the “incumbent at third base” (Blum, though technically an incumbent, was never a full-time starter in Houston… he was a utility infielder while Ty Wigginton was the starter) and Aaron Boone as the backup (Boone is auditioning for a spot, and wasn’t even really considered a favorite coming into camp). 

The third base spot, like fifth starter and catcher, is very much up for grabs.  To label Boone and Blum as the odds-on favorites to play the position is reaching, at best.  Irresponsible at worst.

Lou Palmisano2.jpgLast on the list, at #92, is catcher Lou Palmisano, who the Orioles chose in the Rule 5 draft and gave to the Astros for cash money.  The only problem is that the Rule 5 draft forces a player into waivers if they don’t stay on the roster of the team that drafted them for the entire MLB season.  If they clear waivers, they are returned to the team.  With quite a few options at catcher, the likelihood of the Astros committing o
ne of only two spots to Palmisano, who hasn’t played catcher since 2007 because of a torn meniscus, seems unlikely.  Even with all of our question marks at the position.

His early Spring Training results, 0-for-5 in 3 games, aren’t helping him much.  Grey goes on to note that “even if he is sent back to Milwaukee, there’s a chance he could earn a backup role there.”  However, with Vinny Rottino, Angel Salome, and Mike Rivera – all good hitters – vying for the backup spot behind Jason Kendall in Milwaukee, the likelihood of Palmisano (who’s never played above AA) earning that spot seems far-fetched, at best.

Fresh Faces (Position Players to Watch)

The big question for the Houston Astros this offseason may well be: Can this team compete this year?  We’ve all heard the naysayers.  Baseball Prospectus recently released their 2009 PECOTA rankings, projecting us as the fifth place team in the NL Central, with 98 losses.

The good news: Historically, the Astros tend to out-perform their PECOTA rankings.  They also tend to out-perform their Pythagorean W-L%.  In 2008, we outdid PECOTA (74-88) by 12 wins, and our Pythageorean W-L% (77-84) by 9 wins. 

This could be viewed as a positive, of course, but it could also be viewed as a false positive.  Giving fans hope beyond expectations heading into the 2009 season.  When you look at this team, not a lot distinguishes it from the 2008 San Diego Padres after Chris Young went down: One of the best aces in the game (Peavy/Oswalt), a good-hitting first baseman (Berkman/Gonzalez), a good corner outfielder (Lee/Giles), a streaky but overall above average shortstop (Greene/Tejada), a patchy starting rotation made of largely of “maybes,” a decent ‘pen with a top-notch closer (Hoffman/Valverde), and not a lot off of the bench.

That Padres team put together 99 losses.  This Astros team is predicted, by PECOTA, to lose 96 games.

I don’t say this to be a naysayer at all.  Like most Astros fans, I will still live and die with each game.  I will still cheer just as loudly for each win.  I will still try to put a positive spin on even the worst game.  But it’s important to be realistic, and with that in mind, I believe it’s time to see what the youngsters can do.

The buzz has it that the Astros organization is pretty low on talent.  That’s not untrue, but there are a few standouts, and I suspect we’ll get a look at a great many of them.  Let’s take a look at some of these young men and what we may have to look forward to.  By and large, this could very well be a glimpse at the Astros’ 2010 lineup.  For now, let’s view it as a look at the silver lining.  Because while the organization may not be in the best shape, it does have some decent prospects who could earn valuable playing time this season:

Lou Palmisano.jpgC Lou Palmisano – The catcher position is an awkward one for the Astros.  They actually have a pretty decent stockpile of talent at the position, at least in terms of quantity, but not a lot of quality.  That situation wasn’t exactly remedied when the Orioles chose Lou Palmisano from the Brewers organization in the Rule 5 Draft and then sent him to Houston for cash.  For those unfamiliar with the Rule 5 Draft, basically if you select a player, you must keep him on your Major League roster for the entire season.  If you do not, he can be claimed off waivers by another team (who must then keep him on their major league roster) or return him to the original team.  Palmisano is a promising offensive option behind the plate, but has yet to play above AA ball.  Because of medical issues, he hasn’t played catcher in a game since 2007.  Anything but a sure-fire major league prospect at the moment.  Projection: With Toby Hall out due to injury, if Palmisano shows any promise at all at the plate, he will probably break camp with the big league team. Still, it’s hard to imagine Towles and Quintero both being sent down, and since catcher is one of the few positions with some organizational depth, I suspect Palmisano will be returned to the Brewers organization.

Tommy Manzella.jpgSS Tommy Manzella – Despite hitting a major bump when he got to AAA Round Rock, Manzella is one of my favorites among the Astros’ minor league players.  His Round Rock line is anything but impressive: .219/.273/.294 in 228 at-bats, but his 2008 line in AA Corpus Christi was .299/.346/.446 in 224 at-bats.  He’s improved his defense, and with a good spring and a few more months of AAA ball, he could well be poised to step up and claim his place as the Astros’ shortstop of the future.   Projection: Manzella will wear a Houston Astros uniform this season.  Expect him to make the club sometime in late May or early June and compile somewhere in the vicinity of 100-120 at-bats.

Edwin Maysonet.jpgSS Edwin Maysonet – Maysonet is a versatile infielder – he’s mainly played the shortstop position, but has also played a lot of second base, and has occasionally been asked to fill in at third and in the outfield.  He’s shown remarkable consistently through the minors, clocking in right around .260/.330/.360 each season.  Last year at Round Rock, his line was .271/.343/.379.  Nothing that will blow anyone away, and his glove isn’t the best in the organization, either.  Still, he’s a serviceable-enough backup infielder.  Projection: Maysonet will likely be pressed into service at some point this season, but don’t look for anything more than 50 or so at-bats.

Drew Sutton.jpg2B Drew Sutton – Sutton is a promising young infielder who plays primarily second base, but also third.  He has yet to make a plate appearance at any level above AA, but his 2008 Corpus Christi line sure does look good: .317/.408/.523 with 20 stolen bases in 27 attempts, 20 home runs in 520 AB, and 76 walks to 98 strikeouts.  His glovework isn’t dazzling (16 errors in 99 games), but he’s one of the better prospects currently in the organization.  Projection: With the revolving-door that third base promises to be this season, as well as Kaz Matsui’s inevitable injury woes, Sutton figures to see the big leagues.  I don’t know that I’d expect him to perform extraordinarily, but don’t let that put you off.  He may be a year or two away, but expect Sutton to continue to do well in the organization.

Brian Bogusevic.jpgSP OF Brian Bogusevic – The Astros drafted Bogusevic as a position player out of Tulane University, then moved him to the pitching mound, where he struggled, never posting a season ERA under 4.61.  He’s since been moved back to the outfield, and has responded by becoming one of the Astros’ highest-rated prospects, thanks largely to his .371/.447/.556 line in 124 at-bats at Corpus Christi in 2008.  In case you’ve never heard of “baseball” before, that’s pretty darned impressive.  Projection: Bogusevic hasn’t played above AA yet, but expect a meteoric rise through the system this year.  With so many questions in the Astros’ outfield, I expect him to get some time at the big league level, perhaps even breaking through as a starter late in the season if there are injuries to Lee or Pence.

Yordany Ramirez.jpgOF Yordany Ramirez –  With the unfortunate departure of Jordan Parraz in the Tyler Lumsden trade, Ramirez and 17-year-old Jay Austin may be the two best “fast guys” in the Houston Astros organization.  Ramirez didn’t have a stellar year at Round Rock in 2008 – in fact, it was pretty lousy  (.231/.254/.382).  But he’s shown flashes throughout his time in the minors, and he’ll be 24 this year.  He was widely-regarded as the Padres’ top defensive outfield prospect, has stolen 108 of 140 in his minor league career, and just happens to play centerfield, a position of need for the Astros.  Projection: It’s tough to know which Yordany we’re going to see.  If he can strike out less and walk more (he has 67 career minor league walks to 322 strikeouts), then the sky is the limit.  As it is, he projects as another Michael Bourn type.  I’d love to think either of them is going to turn it around this year, but I’m not overly optimistic.

Jason Castro.jpgC Jason Castro – Since I became an Astros fan in the mid-eighties, I can remember four times when I threw my hands up at an Astros’ draft choice.  It all starts with the time we made Phil Nevin the #1 overall draft choice… ahead of Derek Jeter.  Second was when we took catcher Max Sapp over Joba Chamberlain. The third-most egregious pick, in my opinion, was when we selected Mike Rosamond ahead of Carl Crawford.  Last year’s selection of Jason Castro, a contact-hitting lefty catcher out of Stanford University, ahead of switch-hitting first baseman Justin Smoak, may well break those ranks.  I’m reserving judgement for now, but I have to say that every time I see Astros fans pinning the hopes of the team’s future on Castro, who went .275/.383/.384 in 138 at-bats at Short Season Tri-City.  He inexplicably received a Spring Training invitation this year, and has definitely been tagged as the catcher of the future.  Oh, and Smoak?  .304/.355/.518 for Texas’s Midwest League affiliate, the Clinton LumberKings.  Projection: Don’t expect Castro to play in the big leagues this year.  He’ll need to prove himself over the course of a full minor league season first, and the Astros have plenty of depth at the catcher position.

Brian Esposito.jpgC Brian Esposito – Esposito will be 30 years old coming into the 2009 season, and has amassed a grand total of one inning of major league experience since being drafted by the Red Sox in the 5th round of the 2000 draft out of the University of Connecticut.  The Astros are his sixth organization in the past nine seasons, and he’s likely to start the season in Corpus Christi, his twelfth team in that same nine seasons.  In that time, he’s put together an unimpressive .214/.251/.305 line.  The fact that he is in Spring Training this year, instead of a more-deserving candidate like, say, Eli Iorg, is a testament to the Astros’ trainwreck of a catching situation.  Projection: Esposito will not play as an Astro this season.

Lou Santangelo.jpgC Lou Santangelo – In 2008, 109 baserunners tried to steal a base against Santangelo.  34 of them were caught.  And that sums up Santangelo behind the plate.  At the plate, he generally registers in the .240/.310/.420 mark, though he did hit a major speed bump in limited play at the AAA level last year.  At the moment, he shouldn’t be considered a big league catching prospect, and only makes this list because he received a Spring Training invitation.  Projection: Santangelo may actually be pressed into service at the big league level to protect Castro from being rushed, but not much should be expected of him.

Chris Johnson.jpg3B Chris Johnson – Finally, the Bataan Death March of catchers ends and we return to an area that seems to have at least some organizational depth – the infield.  Johnson was a bright spot in the organization last year, going .324/.364/.506 at Corpus Christi before being called up to Round Rock, where
he hit a bit of a speed bump to the tune of .218/.252/.287 in just 101 at-bats.  I think with a full year of AAA behind him, he could be a legitimate starting option at third base in 2010.  He needs some work defensively – 23 errors in just 230 chances isn’t exactly sound – but I’m confident he’ll do whatever it takes to get to the big league level.  Projection: Johnson will likely see some time in the big leagues this year, with the large question mark surrounding third base in Houston, and may post some decent numbers.  I still think he’d be better served with another year of seasoning and serious defensive work – or even a move to first base.

Mark Saccomanno.jpg3B Mark Saccomanno – It’s no surprise that I’m a big Mark Saccomanno fan.  He led Round Rock in home runs (27) and total bases (275), and was in the top five in doubles (33), triples (2), RBI (84), SLG (.521), and… er… errors.  In fact, his 24 errors was 11 more than Maysonet, who was second with 13 at a tougher position.  In fact, only Tacoma’s Matt Tuiasosopo had more errors in the PCL with 27.  So make no mistake: Saccomanno is a butcher in the field.  But his stick is something to be reckoned with, even beyond the fact that he turned the very first big league pitch he ever saw – an Ian Snell fastball – into a home run.  Projection: Saccomanno should find his place as the everyday starter at third base by late May, and aside from ceding some late-inning defensive innings to Geoff Blum, should see a lot of time there.  I expect a big season from him.

Eli Iorg.jpgOF Eli Iorg – If Eli’s name sounds familiar to you, it should.  His father, Garth, played for the Blue Jays for nine seasons from the late eighties to the late nineties.  His uncle, Dane, played outfield and first base (and even pitched three innings!) for the Phillies, Royals, and Padres – but mostly the Cardinals – over the span of 10 seasons from 1977-1985.  His brother, Cale, is a shortstop in the Tigers’ organization.  As for Eli, he’ll be entering his fifth season in the Astros minors, and has put together a nice little .274/.325/.450 line in his time at Greeneville, Lexington, Salem, and Corpus Christi.  Projection: Eli’s been moving right along, and should start the season in AAA Round Rock.  I do think he has an outside shot at cracking the big league squad this season, and I’m pretty confident he’ll rise to the challenge.  Definitely one to watch.

Koby Clemens.jpgC Koby Clemens – Clemens started life in the Astros organization as a third baseman, but in 2008 he was moved to catcher, because apparently someone thought that there wasn’t enough depth at that position.  He hasn’t exactly exploded offensively, but in 2008 with Salem, he put together a very respectable .268/.369/.423.   He threw out 45 of 130 basestealers (meanies, picking on the new catcher) – 35%.  Not bad, all things considered.  Projection: I actually wouldn’t be too surprised to see Koby crack the big leagues at some point this season, but I do expect he’ll spend the majority of the season between Lancaster and Corpus Christi.

Up next: The fresh-faced pitchers.

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